Reviews

”Jess Nesling amused me no end as she tried to find her motivation for being an albatross […]. In worrying and troublesome times, I really can’t think of a better way of spending a Friday night.”

”[T]he cast threw themselves into the action with real relish. […] Charles II was brilliantly played as a kind of rock god by Scott Ellis, while Jess Nesling was his match playing two of his mistresses, one a ghastly English snob, the other a bitchy French aristo.”

“Leontes, played by Scott Ellis, felt like the rock the production was built on, while riveting, strong support came from Rhianna McGreevy as Paulina, Jess Nesling as his queen, Hermione, and Beth Mullen.”

“[…] in its equally tricky echo with Elizabeth, Jess Nesling captures a real sense of the queen’s loss.”

“The female members of the cast, especially Jess Nesling as Queen Elizabeth and Bryony Tebbutt as Lady Anne are mesmerising in their main roles”

“Jess Nesling impresses as a Queen Elizabeth who just might refrain from falling for Richard’s plans.”

“All the women in this production are outstanding. […] Jess Nesling easily straddles comedy and drama”

“[…] the two princes (Bryony Tebbutt and Jess Nesling) bringing light-hearted and cheeky children to Richard III.”

“The versatility of each member of the cast is impeccable. Both Jess Nesling and Bryony Tebbutt seamlessly weave in and out of playing distraught, widowed wives to young sibling princes within a matter of seconds and a quick costume change.”

“He is well supported by a cast of 10 in particular the pivotal ladies, the prophetic Queen Margaret, (Louise Templeton), the delightful Lady Anne (Bryony Hooper) and the strong Queen Elizabeth (Jess Nesling).”

”Overall, the cast of Up the Bunty are rather talented. […] Jess Nesling, as Pamela Maitland, was a particular highlight. Nesling was excellent, and convincingly pulled off a variety of different accents. In addition to this, both Neale and Nesling had excellent singing voices.”

“Standing Ovariation, the brainchild of writer/performers Jess Nesling and Natalie Durkin, brought together a well-curated night of sketch, monologue and song all performed and written by women. […] The standout pieces of the night were the most original and sometimes surreal. Melody the dolphin trainer (written and performed by Larner Wallace-Taylor) was a particular highlight as were two very clever songs- London song by Amy Alexander and Addiction by Jess Nesling (both with music and accompaniment by Sarah Nesling and hysterical backup singers Natalie Durkin and Amy Alexander.)”

“As she cast a spell on her audience with her enchanting voice, Jess Nesling, one of the soloists from London, was showered with praise and love by the crowd at the recent performance in the City with the Toccata Musical Productions, UK, in collaboration with the ‘Kenyan Boys Choir.’ […] Her positivity and charm can sweep anyone off their feet.”

“It’s always good to see actors playing expertly off each other and Sian Owens and Jess Nesling are delightful as a pair of Welsh shop supervisors in a rather engaging quasi chorus taking to task a recalcitrant member of staff in Revolt, She Said, Revolt Again by Alice Birch. Nesling shows herself an intelligent, versatile actor in part of Mark Ravenhill’s Handbag too, in which she and Lucy Ford also pleasing are a pair of middle class gay mothers trying to dismiss their ‘inferior’ babysitter Ella-May Hooper.”